Family Is Why

 

By: American Heart Association

Originally published on Nov 18, 2015

Being a mom isn’t easy. Especially when it comes to making sure your family lives a healthy lifestyle. Relax mom. The American Heart Association has your back.

Learn how you can unite with other moms and impact the health of your family, and families everywhere, by visiting lifeiswhy.org/moms.

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Why Do We Love Sugar?

 

By: BrainCraft

Originally published on Nov 12, 2015

My Twitter https://twitter.com/nessyhill | Instagram https://instagram.com/nessyhill

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Can You be Addicted to Sugar: https://youtu.be/1aLCwDT-X6c
Are Some Sweeteners Better Than Others? https://youtu.be/6hXg_y4z3VM

BrainCraft is created and hosted by Vanessa Hill and brought to you by PBS Digital Studios. Talking psychology, neuroscience & why we act the way we do.
Sound design: Joel Werner (http://joelwerner.com)
Producer: Ella Colley

Keep in touch, won’t you?
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More BrainCraft!
How Old Are You, Really? https://youtu.be/aWvw-v6tnZE
The Surprising Ways Death Shapes Our Lives: https://youtu.be/Joalg73L_gw

REFERENCES

Steiner, J.E. Facial Expressions of the Neonate Infant Indication the Hedonics of Food Related Chemical Stimuli in Weiffenbach, J. M. (Ed.). (1977). Taste and development: The genesis of sweet preference. US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health. http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id…

Avena, N. M., Gold, J. A., Kroll, C., & Gold, M. S. (2012). Further developments in the neurobiology of food and addiction: update on the state of the science.Nutrition, 28(4), 341-343. https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/3…

Lustig, R. H., Schmidt, L. A., & Brindis, C. D. (2012). Public health: The toxic truth about sugar. Nature, 482(7383), 27-29. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/…

A history of sugar – the food nobody needs, but everyone craves https://theconversation.com/a-history…

Bello, N. T., Lucas, L. R., & Hajnal, A. (2002). Repeated sucrose access influences dopamine D2 receptor density in the striatum. Neuroreport, 13(12), 1575. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

Preedy, V. R., Watson, R. R., & Martin, C. R. (2011). Handbook of behavior, food and nutrition. Springer Science & Business Media. https://books.google.com/books?id=KuA…

Also this is SO INTERESTING: Bes-Rastrollo, M., Schulze, M. B., Ruiz-Canela, M., & Martinez-Gonzalez, M. A. (2013). Financial conflicts of interest and reporting bias regarding the association between sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review of systematic reviews. http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine…

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You Are Why (American Heart Association)

 

By: American Heart Association

Originally published on Nov 14, 2016

You Are Why the American Heart Association gives thanks, for all of the ways you help us save millions of lives.

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/

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8 Clever Ways to Use Coconut Oil

Source: 8 Clever Ways to Use Coconut Oil by HouseholdHacker on Rumble

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Forget Counting Steps. Quantifying Health Will Save Your Life.

 

By: Big Think

Originallly published on Sep 19, 2015

Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/daniel-kra…

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Transcript – One of the interesting things about healthcare today is the data is becoming unsiloed and increasingly accessible. So for example, I’m wearing right now a little patch from a company called Vital Connect underneath my shirt. It’s talking to my smartphone live. And I can look at a dashboard of my data from my full on EKG, which will show up right here and it can track the trends and hopefully my EKG looks like it’s okay, if there are any cardiologist out there. I can also see data about my steps, my stress level, my position. If I fall down and I don’t get back up, the system can tell that. And this is really an intensive care unit like type level data in what will be less than five dollar a day disposable patch, which can be useful if you’re training for a marathon; if you’re in a hospital and you’re not on a monitored bed; if your home with a disease like heart failure. That’s a lot of data. We need to learn to sift through it and pull out the signals because no physician or nurse is going to want to be liable for watching your life streaming EKG. But is an immense amount of power and data. And we’re in this era now of creating digital health exhaust, whether it’s my smart watch, this patch, my phone, it can tell a lot about me, my behaviors. If, for example, you have a patient who’s got bipolar disorder, you can tell from their phone whether they’re depressed or they’re manic. That can play a role in smart disease, disease management. We can take technologies like 3-D printing and tune home-based prosthetics. We can print prosthetic hands for folks and legs in the developing world. Here’s mini me in my pocket. It’s a 3-D printed version of me. That might be interesting if I need to make a prosthetic for someone who has lost part of her face. Or I was at MIT Media Lab last week and met a young grad student who diagnosed his own brain cancer, written up in the New York Times, and used 3-D printing to print a version of his tumor. Read the Full Transcript Here: (http://goo.gl/AGiEyV).

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