Seven Minutes of Terror: The Challenges of Getting to Mars

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Jun 22, 2012

Team members at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory share the challenges of the Curiosity Mars rover’s final minutes to landing on the surface of Mars.

 

Share Button

The Verge: SpaceX’s plan to colonize Mars, explained

 

By: The Verge

Published on Sep 28, 2016

Elon Musk gave the biggest talk of his life in Guadalajara, Mexico, where he detailed his plans to set up a self-sustaining colony of 1 million people on Mars. He knows the rockets and spaceships he wants to build, but many questions still need to be answered if he wants to pull off such an ambitious feat. The Verge’s Loren Grush breaks down some of the challenges with input from Bill Nye (CEO of The Planetary Society) and Will Pomerantz (VP Special Projects, Virgin Galactic).

Subscribe: https://goo.gl/G5RXGs

Check out our full video catalog: https://goo.gl/lfcGfq
Visit our playlists: https://goo.gl/94XbKx
Like The Verge on Facebook: https://goo.gl/2P1aGc
Follow on Twitter: https://goo.gl/XTWX61
Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX
Read More: http://www.theverge.com

 

 

Share Button

Making Humans a Multiplanetary Species

 

By: SpaceX

Published on Sep 27, 2016

SpaceX Founder, CEO, and Lead Designer Elon Musk will discuss the long-term technical challenges that need to be solved to support the creation of a permanent, self-sustaining human presence on Mars. The technical presentation will focus on potential architectures for sustaining humans on the Red Planet that industry, government and the scientific community can collaborate on in the years ahead.

Share Button

SpaceX Interplanetary Transport System

 

By: SpaceX

Originally published on Sep 27, 2016

Share Button

STEM Students React to Generation Beyond Mars Experience Bus | Lockheed Martin

 

By: LockheedMartinVideos

Originally published on Apr 20, 2016

How do you help children to truly believe in their potential? You take them further than they ever dreamed they’d go.

The first people who will visit Mars are sitting in a school today. In fact, the first astronauts will arrive before today’s kindergartners graduate college. To help inspire these students, Lockheed Martin created a one-of-a-kind bus that transports students to the surface of Mars.

Go further at lockheedmartin.com/generationbeyond

Share Button

NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover at Namib Dune (360 Video)

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally Published on Feb 8, 2016

This view of the downwind face of “Namib Dune” on Mars covers 360 degrees, including a portion of Mount Sharp on the horizon. The site is part of the dark-sand “Bagnold Dunes” field along the northwestern flank of Mount Sharp. Images taken from orbit indicate that dunes in the Bagnold field move as much as about 3 feet (1 meter) per Earth year.

The component images of this scene were taken on Dec. 18, 2015, by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover during the 1,197th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars.

Full caption and downloadable images at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/d…

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

 

Share Button

Curiosity Rover Report (August 2015): Three Years on Mars!

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Aug 3, 2015

After three action-packed years on Mars, the Curiosity rover is ready to take on higher slopes of Mount Sharp.

Share Button

Pluto in a Minute: 50 Years of Imaging

 

By: NASA New Horizons

Originally published on Jul 14, 2015

The next images New Horizons sends back will be the last first views of a planet we will see for a very long time. This is Pluto in a Minute.

We have been seeing new worlds in the solar system almost as long as we’ve been exploring space. The first ever views of another world that we got came from Mariner 4. On July 14, 1965, it flew by Mars and took the first ever images of the planet’s surface. Another Mariner mission, Mariner 10, was the first to image Venus but we can’t see its surface because of the thick clouds. The spacecraft then went on to its primary target, Mercury, and took the first ever pictures of the planet closest to our Sun in 1974.

Things got really interesting in 1977 when NASA launched the twin Voyager spacecraft on a mission to the outer planets. Voyager 1 reached the Jupiter system first and returned the first ever images of the gas giant in 1979. It reached Saturn, the ringed planet, to return the first images, in 1980. In 1986, Voyager 2 flew past Uranus and took the first ever images of the world on its side, and in 1989 it passed Neptune to return the first ever images of that world.

New Horizons is making its close flyby of Pluto and it is going to return the most stunning images we’ve seen from the mission yet, and they will be a sight better than the first images we saw of Mars 50 years ago today.

For more on Pluto check out the New Horizons websites and tweet your questions using the hashtag #PlutoFlyby. And of course, come back here tomorrow for more Pluto in a minute.

http://www.nasa.gov/newhorizons
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu

Share Button

Rover’s-Eye View of Marathon on Mars

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally uploaded on Jul 2, 2015

Road trip! This compilation of images from hazard-avoidance cameras on NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity between January 2004 and April 2015 shows the rover’s-eye-view of the Martian marathon covering 26.2 miles(42.2 kilometers) from its landing location. A map of the rover’s path is on the right.

Share Button

Journey to Space Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

 

By: Film Festivals and Indie Films

Published on Mar 6, 2015

Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h
Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn
Subscribe to INDIE TRAILERS: http://goo.gl/iPUuo
Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73
Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt
Journey to Space Official Trailer 1 (2015) – Documentary HD

Journey to Space is a celebration of space exploration, a tribute to international cooperation in space research and a vision toward our near-term future beyond Earth’s orbit – a manned mission to Mars within a generation. The film beautifully and inspiringly chronicles the space shuttle program, MIR, the ISS and the Hubble telescope – paying tribute to these accolades in the context of our future in space. Dazzling computer imagery depicts the spacecraft, habitats, landers, and vehicles necessary to achieve interplanetary travel, touchdown and colonization. Journey to Space taps into our unquenchable drive to explore and discover what lies beyond, a vision certain to inspire today’s young explorers and dreamers. This is the time for our species, in the words of Carl Sagan, to “set sail across the cosmic ocean.” Next stop… Mars!

“journey to space” “journey to space documentary” “journey to space trailer” documentary space exploration “Mark Krenzien” “Patrick Stewart” future mission mars “space program” vchan

Share Button