NASA Jets Chase The Total Solar Eclipse

By: NASA Goddard

Originally published on Jul 25, 2017

For most viewers, the Aug. 21, 2017, total solar eclipse will last less than two and half minutes. But for one team of NASA-funded scientists, the eclipse will last over seven minutes. Their secret? Following the shadow of the Moon in two retrofitted WB-57F jet planes. Amir Caspi of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, and his team will use two of NASA’s WB-57F research jets to chase the darkness across America on Aug. 21. Taking observations from twin telescopes mounted on the noses of the planes, Caspi will capture the clearest images of the Sun’s outer atmosphere — the corona — to date and the first-ever thermal images of Mercury, revealing how temperature varies across the planet’s surface.

Music credit: ‘Mighty Piano’ by Laurent Levesque [SACEM] from K iller Tracks

Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/2uVECDc

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12179

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Joy Ng and Mara Johnson-Groh

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Awesome Video of the Mercury Transit Path

 

By: NASA.gov Video

Originally published on May 3, 2016

The Mercury transit will occur between about 7:12 a.m. and 2:42 p.m. EDT on May 9, 2016.

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NASA’s SDO Captures Mercury Transit Time-lapse

 

By: NASA Goddard

Originally published on May 9, 2016

Around 13 times per century, Mercury passes between Earth and the sun in a rare astronomical event known as a planetary transit. The 2016 Mercury transit occurred on May 9, between roughly 7:12 a.m. and 2:42 p.m. EDT.

The images in this video are from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.

Video credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein

Music: Encompass by Mark Petrie

For more info on the Mercury transit go to: http://www.nasa.gov/transit

This video is public domain and may be downloaded at:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12235

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Pluto in a Minute: 50 Years of Imaging

 

By: NASA New Horizons

Originally published on Jul 14, 2015

The next images New Horizons sends back will be the last first views of a planet we will see for a very long time. This is Pluto in a Minute.

We have been seeing new worlds in the solar system almost as long as we’ve been exploring space. The first ever views of another world that we got came from Mariner 4. On July 14, 1965, it flew by Mars and took the first ever images of the planet’s surface. Another Mariner mission, Mariner 10, was the first to image Venus but we can’t see its surface because of the thick clouds. The spacecraft then went on to its primary target, Mercury, and took the first ever pictures of the planet closest to our Sun in 1974.

Things got really interesting in 1977 when NASA launched the twin Voyager spacecraft on a mission to the outer planets. Voyager 1 reached the Jupiter system first and returned the first ever images of the gas giant in 1979. It reached Saturn, the ringed planet, to return the first images, in 1980. In 1986, Voyager 2 flew past Uranus and took the first ever images of the world on its side, and in 1989 it passed Neptune to return the first ever images of that world.

New Horizons is making its close flyby of Pluto and it is going to return the most stunning images we’ve seen from the mission yet, and they will be a sight better than the first images we saw of Mars 50 years ago today.

For more on Pluto check out the New Horizons websites and tweet your questions using the hashtag #PlutoFlyby. And of course, come back here tomorrow for more Pluto in a minute.

http://www.nasa.gov/newhorizons
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu

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MESSENGER at Mercury

 

By: NASASolarSystem

Originally Published on Apr 27, 2015

The robotic spacecraft MESSENGER has run out of fuel. With no way to make major adjustments to its orbit around the planet Mercury, the probe will smash into the surface at more than 8,750 miles per hour (3.91 kilometers per second). The impact will add a new crater to the planet’s scarred face that engineers estimate will be as wide as 52 feet (16 meters).

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