NASA & TRAPPIST-1: A Treasure Trove of Planets Found

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Feb 22, 2017

Seven Earth-sized planets have been observed by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope around a tiny, nearby, ultra-cool dwarf star called TRAPPIST-1. Three of these planets are firmly in the habitable zone.

Over 21 days, NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope measured the drop in light as each planet passed in front of the star. Spitzer was able to identify a total of seven rocky worlds, including three in the habitable zone, where liquid water might be found.

The video features interviews with Sean Carey, manager of the Spitzer Science Center, Caltech/IPAC; Nikole Lewis, James Webb Space Telescope project scientist, Space Telescope Science Institute; and Michaël Gillon, principal investigator, TRAPPIST, University of Liege, Belgium.

The system has been revealed through observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the ground-based TRAPPIST (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) telescope, as well as other ground-based observatories. The system was named for the TRAPPIST telescope.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Science operations are conducted at the Spitzer Science Center at Caltech in Pasadena. Spacecraft operations are based at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Littleton, Colorado. Data are archived at the Infrared Science Archive housed at Caltech/IPAC. Caltech manages JPL for NASA. For more information about Spitzer, visit http://www.nasa.gov/spitzer and http://spitzer.caltech.edu.

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Share Button

We Conquered Jupiter’: Juno Enters Orbit

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Jul 6, 2016

A recap of the July 4 excitement as NASA’s Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter. After an almost five-year journey to the solar system’s largest planet, Juno successfully entered Jupiter’s orbit during a 35-minute engine burn. Confirmation that the burn had completed was received on Earth at 8:53 pm. PDT (11:53 p.m. EDT) Monday, July 4. For more about Juno, visit http://nasa.gov/juno and http://missionjuno.swri.edu.

Share Button

NASA’s “Eyes” App: See Juno Get to Jupiter

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Jul 2, 2016

Fly along with Juno during Jupiter orbit insertion with NASA’s “Eyes on the Solar System” app. This video shows how in four simple steps. Visit http://eyes.nasa.gov to get started.

Note by HottestWebVideos.com:  The program, is well worth downloading and using it.

Share Button

NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover at Namib Dune (360 Video)

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally Published on Feb 8, 2016

This view of the downwind face of “Namib Dune” on Mars covers 360 degrees, including a portion of Mount Sharp on the horizon. The site is part of the dark-sand “Bagnold Dunes” field along the northwestern flank of Mount Sharp. Images taken from orbit indicate that dunes in the Bagnold field move as much as about 3 feet (1 meter) per Earth year.

The component images of this scene were taken on Dec. 18, 2015, by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover during the 1,197th Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s work on Mars.

Full caption and downloadable images at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/d…

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

 

Share Button

Curiosity Rover Report (August 2015): Three Years on Mars!

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Aug 3, 2015

After three action-packed years on Mars, the Curiosity rover is ready to take on higher slopes of Mount Sharp.

Share Button

Rover’s-Eye View of Marathon on Mars

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally uploaded on Jul 2, 2015

Road trip! This compilation of images from hazard-avoidance cameras on NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity between January 2004 and April 2015 shows the rover’s-eye-view of the Martian marathon covering 26.2 miles(42.2 kilometers) from its landing location. A map of the rover’s path is on the right.

Share Button

Dawn, Mission to the Asteroid Belt (HD) – Narrated by *Leonard Nimoy

 


By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally Published on Feb 27, 2015

Produced in 2007, this overview video about NASA’s Dawn mission to giant asteroid Vesta and dwarf planet Ceres was released before the spacecraft’s launch that year. The mission greatly appreciated *Leonard Nimoy’s support and participation. Dawn investigated Vesta in 2011-2012, and will arrive at Ceres March 6, 2015. For more information about Dawn, visit http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/ .

* Leonard Nimoy passed away this past friday Feb, 27th, 2015. He will be missed. RIP.

Astronaut Terry W. Virts () tweeted a wonderful tribute aboard the International Space Station (ISS) heres a link to the Tweet 

Share Button

SMAP: Mapping Global Soil Moisture, Managing a Better Future

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally Uploaded on Dec 30, 2014

Launching in January 2015, NASA’s Soil Moisture Mapping satellite (SMAP) will track water in the soil. Data gathered with help forecast weather, floods, drought, crop yield and landslides.

 

 

 

Share Button