Top 16 Earth Images of 2016

 

By: NASA Johnson

Originally published on Dec 19, 2016

Astronauts on the International Space Station take pictures of Earth out their windows nearly every day; over a year that adds up to thousands of photos. The people at the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston pored through this year’s crop to pick the top 16 photos of Earth for 2016—enjoy!

HD download link: https://archive.org/details/TheSpaceP…
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Showstopper Nov. 14 Supermoon is the Closest Moon to Earth since 1948

 

By: NASA Goddard

Originally published on Nov 9, 2016

The moon is a familiar sight, but the days leading up to Monday, Nov. 14, promise a spectacular supermoon show. When a full moon makes its closest pass to Earth in its orbit it appears up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter, making it a supermoon. This month’s is especially ‘super’ for two reasons: it is the only supermoon this year to be completely full, and it is the closest moon to Earth since 1948. The moon won’t be this super again until 2034!

Credit: NASA Goddard/Clare Skelly

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12404

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Seven Minutes of Terror: The Challenges of Getting to Mars

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Jun 22, 2012

Team members at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory share the challenges of the Curiosity Mars rover’s final minutes to landing on the surface of Mars.

 

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Hubble Telescope Directly Images Possible Water Vapor Plumes on Europa

 

By: NASA Goddard

Originally Published on Sep 26, 2016

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope took direct ultraviolet images of the icy moon Europa transiting across the disk of Jupiter.

Out of ten observations, Hubble saw what may be water vapor plumes on three of the images. This adds another piece of supporting evidence to the existence of water vapor plumes on Europa – Hubble also detected spectroscopic signatures of water vapor in 2012.

The existence of water vapor plumes could provide a future Europa flyby mission the opportunity to study the conditions and habitability of Europa’s subsurface ocean.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson

Music: “Next Generation” by Enrico Cacace [BMI]; Atmosphere Music Ltd PRS; Volta Music; Killer Tracks Production Music

For more information: http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nas…

Read the science paper at http://hubblesite.org/pubinfo/pdf/201…

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at:https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12375

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NASA just launched a spacecraft to steal some asteroid particles

 

By: The Verge

Originally published on Sep 9, 2016

NASA just successfully launched its OSIRIS-REx spacecraft on an Atlas V rocket. Now, the vehicle is on its way to scoop up pieces of an asteroid and bring them back to Earth, a journey that will take seven years to complete. But if successful, those asteroid pieces could tell researchers a lot about the early Solar System and how life got started on our own planet.

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Expedition 48-49 launches to the ISS

 

By: NASA Johnson

Originally published on Jul 6, 2016

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, and astronaut Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched on the Russian Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft at 7:36 a.m. Baikonur time, July 7 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to begin a two-day journey to the International Space Station and the start of a four-month mission.

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We Conquered Jupiter’: Juno Enters Orbit

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Jul 6, 2016

A recap of the July 4 excitement as NASA’s Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter. After an almost five-year journey to the solar system’s largest planet, Juno successfully entered Jupiter’s orbit during a 35-minute engine burn. Confirmation that the burn had completed was received on Earth at 8:53 pm. PDT (11:53 p.m. EDT) Monday, July 4. For more about Juno, visit http://nasa.gov/juno and http://missionjuno.swri.edu.

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Juno Approach Movie of Jupiter and the Galilean Moons

 

By: NASAJuno

Originally published on Jul 4, 2016

NASA’s Juno spacecraft captured a unique time-lapse movie of the Galilean satellites in motion about Jupiter. The movie begins on June 12th with Juno 10 million miles from Jupiter, and ends on June 29th, 3 million miles distant. The innermost moon is volcanic Io; next in line is the ice-crusted ocean world Europa, followed by massive Ganymede, and finally, heavily cratered Callisto. Galileo observed these moons to change position with respect to Jupiter over the course of a few nights. From this observation he realized that the moons were orbiting mighty Jupiter, a truth that forever changed humanity’s understanding of our place in the cosmos. Earth was not the center of the Universe. For the first time in history, we look upon these moons as they orbit Jupiter and share in Galileo’s revelation. This is the motion of nature’s harmony.

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Juno spacecraft Jupiter arrival animation

 

By: NASAJuno

Originally uploaded on Jul 27, 2011

Find out more at http://missionjuno.swri.edu and http://www.nasa.gov/juno.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft is scheduled to arrive at the giant planet Jupiter in July 2016 following a five-year trek. As the spacecraft nears the planet it executes a series of maneuvers to prepare for Jupiter orbit insertion. First, the spacecraft opens its main engine cover. Then Juno uses thrusters to re-orient itself so that its main engine points in the direction the spacecraft is moving. Juno’s thrusters then fire to increase the spacecraft’s rate of spin from 2 rotations per minute to 5 rotations per minute; the faster rate of rotation makes Juno more stable during the engine burn to come.

Juno fires its main engine for about 30 minutes to slow down and allow Jupiter’s gravity to capture the speeding spacecraft into orbit. Following the engine burn, Juno decreases its rate of spin and points its giant solar arrays back toward the sun and Earth (which at Jupiter’s location appear close together in the sky). At this point the spacecraft will be successfully in orbit around the giant world.

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NASA’s “Eyes” App: See Juno Get to Jupiter

 

By: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Originally published on Jul 2, 2016

Fly along with Juno during Jupiter orbit insertion with NASA’s “Eyes on the Solar System” app. This video shows how in four simple steps. Visit http://eyes.nasa.gov to get started.

Note by HottestWebVideos.com:  The program, is well worth downloading and using it.

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