2017 Hurricanes and Aerosols Simulation

By: NASA Goddard

Originally published on Nov 13, 2017

How can you see the atmosphere? By tracking what is carried on the wind. Tiny aerosol particles such as smoke, dust, and sea salt are transported across the globe, making visible weather patterns and other normally invisible physical processes.

This visualization uses data from NASA satellites, combined with mathematical models in a computer simulation allowing scientists to study the physical processes in our atmosphere. By following the sea salt that is evaporated from the ocean, you can see the storms of the 2017 hurricane season.

During the same time, large fires in the Pacific Northwest released smoke into the atmosphere. Large weather patterns can transport these particles long distances: in early September, you can see a line of smoke from Oregon and Washington, down the Great Plains, through the South, and across the Atlantic to England.

Dust from the Sahara is also caught in storms sytems and moved from Africa to the Americas. Unlike the sea salt, however, the dust is removed from the center of the storm. The dust particles are absorbed by cloud droplets and then washed out as it rains.

Advances in computing speed allow scientists to include more details of these physical processes in their simulations of how the aerosols interact with the storm systems.

Supercomputing 2017 conference:
https://www.nas.nasa.gov/SC17/home.html

Credits:
Matthew R. Radcliff (USRA): Lead Producer
Aaron E. Lepsch (ADNET Systems, Inc.): Technical Support
William Putman (NASA/GSFC): Lead Scientist
Anton S. Darmenov (NASA/GSFC): Scientist
Ellen T. Gray (ADNET Systems, Inc.): Narrator

Music: Elapsing Time by Christian Telford [ASCAP], Robert Anthony Navarro [ASCAP]

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12772

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Or subscribe to NASA’s Goddard Shorts HD Podcast: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/…

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Kraken Roller Coaster 360 VR 4K

By: 360 Amazing videos

Originally published on Jun 23, 2017

Kraken Roller Coaster 360 VR 4K

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Introducing New Glenn

 

By: Blue Origin

Originally published Mar 7, 2017

More info here; http://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/07/jeff-bezos-shows-off-engine-for-blue-origin-gigantic-rocket-new-glenn.html

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Milky Way and Andromeda Galaxies Collision Simulated | Video

 

By: VideoFromSpace

Originally Published on May 31, 2012

Using data from the Hubble Space Telescope, scientists have developed this simulation of the head-on collision of our Milky Way galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. Estimated to occur in 4 billion years.

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A virtual Universe

 

By: nature video

Originally Published on May 7, 2014

Scientists at MIT have traced 13 billion years of galaxy evolution, from shortly after the Big Bang to the present day. Their simulation, named Illustris, captures both the massive scale of the Universe and the intriguing variety of galaxies — something previous modelers have struggled to do. It produces a Universe that looks remarkably similar to what we see through our telescopes, giving us greater confidence in our understanding of the Universe, from the laws of physics to our theories about galaxy formation.

Read the research paper: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/…

And the Nature News story: http://www.nature.com/news/model-univ…

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